May 9, 2013

COMPLETED - Roman military tribune - Early Republic - 3rd Century B.C.


(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)

(Pegaso Models - 75 mm)


REFLEXIONS ON A JOB DONE

From start to completion this project took me more than a year. Not because it was a complex figure to build and paint. No, it was just that I had to strip and restart the miniature a few times as a result of some stupid mistakes I made, and, admittedly, a little bad luck too. There were moments that I really got bored with it but I refused to give in on those feelings. Instead I put my other figures aside in order to give my full attention to the Roman. 

Normally I paint my figures in rather muted tones but with this project I decided to go for a more colourful approach suiting the flamboyant appearance of the subject: a military tribune, a young officer of the legion with senatorial ambitions. Hence my choice for a light blue tunic instead of the usual white colour. Originaly my inspiration for the blue colour came from the excellent TV series of Rome in which several actors are seen wearing tunics of this colour. Moreover I like the combination of the blue colour with the purple of the vertical stripes (laticlavii), indicating that the wearer belongs to the equestrian class; the red colour of the scabbard, cross belt and inside of the shield is an additional dash of bright colour.

On the other hand for the front side of the shield and its design I chose the usual earth tints, as I was inspired by this Greek 6th century B.C. amphora on display in the Musée du Louvre at Paris. Later I noticed that this design was also used in the aforementioned TV series as the sign of the Aventine Collegium in former Centurion Lucius Vorenus' tavern.

The design was adapted to my taste and was - as can be seen on the photos here above - cut off at the shoulders. Also the lower dog head was moved to the front to create more depht in the design.

The worn appearance of the shield seems to be contradicting the rather clean state of the rest of the figure. This was done deliberately, however. As family and status were very important in Roman society, I imagined the shield to be an heirloom, maybe given by a proud grandfather to his grandson when he took off for one of the battles with the Carthaginian foe during the First Punic War, which lasted for 23 long years from 264 to 241 B.C.

Right from the start I decided that I would leave the miniature in a clean, so-called 'pre battle' state because I think that this is more suiting to its overall pose. Nevertheless there is no other choice than to tie the figure to the groundwork and for this I used Mig Productions pigments. The weathering was limited to the feet and the lower part of the greaves and implied only the application of dust; the result of marching in the dry, Mediterranean theatre of operations. It was the first time that I used this rather new medium, and being quite satisfied with the results, I certainly will explore the use of these pigments in the future. 

After the long work and the misfortunes that were involved along the way, I am extremely happy that I can put the completed figure in the cabinet. Finally I will be able to move on with the other projects that were gathering dust on my workbench.


AWARDS

Scale Model Challenge 2013: bronze medal (masterclass)


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